International Institute of Communications

Shaping the policy agenda: TELECOMMUNICATIONS • MEDIA • TECHNOLOGY
Tel:+44 (0)20 8544 8076
Fax:+44 (0)20 8544 8077
social twitter sm  social linkedin sm  social youtube sm  social facebook sm
  • Regions
  • Asia Pacific

Asia Pacific

the iic in ASIA PACIFIC

This is an area of rapid technological development where the IIC has four active chapters running events and producing reports on trends and challenges in the region.


Key speakers on Asia Pacific

Syed Ismail Shah (Dr)

Syed Ismail Shah (Dr)

Talks on Asia Pacific

  • Q&A – Manuel Kohnstamm

    Manuel Kohnstamm, Senior Vice President and Chief Corporate Affairs Officer, Liberty Global

  • 5G consultation opened in Europe

    The European Commission has opened a consultation on a coordinated introduction of 5G networks in Europe.

  • A joint paper by the French and the German Competition Authority

    A joint paper by the French Competition Authority (Autorité de la concurrence) and the German Competition Authority (Bundeskartellamt) on data and competition, provides background on the approach to data likely to be taken by two of the most active competition authorities in the EU, a blog at Bird & Bird notes.

  • Accessibility deal for European public sector websites

    A deal to make public sector websites more accessible – particularly to those with disabilities – has been agreed by the three European Union institutions, notes Ars Technica.

  • Bahrain approves new telecoms plan

    There are a number of developments underway in Bahrain which will improve both services and infrastructure, notes BuddeComm.

  • BEREC issues net neutrality recommendations

    The Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) has published draft guidelines on the implementation by regulators of new EU net neutrality rules and is seeking the views of stakeholders, with the consultation closing on 18 July.

  • Brazil regulates on disabled access

    Brazil's National Telecommunications Agency (Anatel) has approved a regulation to ensure access to telecoms services and equipment for people with hearing, visual, motor and cognitive disabilities on an equal basis with others, both in urban and rural areas, notes Telecom Paper.

  • Brazilian regulator agrees corrective measures with operator

    Anatel, Brazil's national telecoms Agency (Anatel) has approved an investment program and corrective measures proposed by operator Oi and worth an estimated BRL3.2 billion, notes Telecom Paper.

  • Canada upholds wholesale fibre regulation

    Navdeep Bains, Canada's minister of innovation, science and economic development, has upheld the decision by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to extend wholesale broadband regulation to fibre to the home.

  • China’s fourth telecoms player

    China's Ministry of Industry and Information (MIIT) has granted a telecoms licence to China Broadcasting Network (CBN), creating a fourth player, but the move is unlikely to speed up broadcasting-telecoms network convergence in the country, reports Mobile World Live.

More InterMedia articles on Asia Pacific

  • A TMT Agenda

    H Sama Nwana makes a passionate case for promoting TMT and not just telecoms in Africa – a case that could benefit all developing nations.
    June 2015, Volume 43 Issue 02

  • Stand and deliver

    As the OECD prepares for a ministerial meeting on the digital economy, Jørgen Abild Andersen argues that the highest level of coordination among many government departments is needed to deliver its aims


    April 2016, Volume 44 Issue 01

  • Making Access Universal

    Universal access and service programmes are vital to extending broadband to all parts of a country. Antonio GarcIa Zaballos discusses the findings of a comparative report.
    June 2015, Volume 43 Issue 02

  • Dealing with Disruption

    As regulators start to fundamentally review their remits, Chris Chapman, the incoming president of the IIC and chair of Australia’s ACMA, details the extent of digital disruption and possible regulatory response, in this two-part article.
    January 2016, Volume 43 Issue 04

  • Dark Clouds?

    Are regulations being applied to cloud computing in a way that stimulates innovation, asks Kuan Hon.
    January 2016, Volume 43 Issue 04

  • Video’s Demands

    Trends in internet video services are becoming apparent, and regulatory and competition agencies need to respond, as Augusto preta reports.
    June 2015, Volume 43 Issue 02

  • Impact of the Sharing Economy

    The modern sharing economy is small but growing - and enabled by the internet. John Ure discusses its possible impact and where regulation may be heading, with particular reference to Asia.
    March 2015, Volume 43 Issue 01

  • Digital Asia

    The goal of promoting digital infrastructure is seeing economic and social progress. peter lovelock takes stock of Asian developments.
    September 2015, Volume 43 Issue 03

  • Focusing ICT On The New UN Development Goals

    How can ICT best be deployed to advance the new Sustainable Development Goals? M-H Carolyn Nguyen and Paul Mitchell review the history and current position.
    January 2016, Volume 43 Issue 04

  • Openings for Zero Rating

    Zero rating is a highly controversial aspect of the internet. AUGUSTO PRETA and PENG PENG provide a cost-benefit analysis amid the context of net neutrality.
    July 2016, Volume 44 Issue 02

  • Protect and Roam

    Matt Hatton reviews the main regulatory trends in the world of M2M and the internet of things.
    March 2015, Volume 43 Issue 01

  • Q&A With Deepak Jacob

    President and General Counsel, Star TV group in India
    September 2015, Volume 43 Issue 03

  • Questions & Answers

    With Syed Shah, chairman of Pakistan’s telecoms authority, PTA.
    October 2016, Volume 44 Issue 03

  • Questions & Answers

    With Takamiki Nishikawa, senior counsel at Fox Networks Group Japan.
    October 2016, Volume 44 Issue 03

  • Radio Crossroads

    Richard Womersley sets the scene for the upcoming world radio conference, where the agenda for mobile spectrum is likely to dominate proceedings.
    September 2015, Volume 43 Issue 03

  • Spectrum Clash

    The pressure on terrestrial broadcasters to give spectrum to the mobile sector shows no sign of letting up. Roland Beutler, at Germany's Südwestrundfunk, a regional public broadcaster, puts his side of the debate.
    September 2015, Volume 43 Issue 03

  • Taking Stock of 5G

    The hype about the next generation of mobile technology is likely to gather pace in the next few years, but currently there is a lot of scepticism about whether it qualifies as an integrated, great leap in progress, as Marc Beishon finds in this round-up
    July 2016, Volume 44 Issue 02

Regulatory Watch articles on Asia Pacific

  • India recommends infrastructure sharing

    The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) has recommended it should be mandatory for telecoms operators and tower firms to share in-building infrastructure in residential and commercial complexes and large public places like malls, hotels and airports...

  • Australia’s national broadband network reaches half-way stage

    The company building and operating Australia’s broadband network – known as nbn – is aiming for it to be almost 50% complete by 30 June 2017, when it will target a total of 5.4 million homes and businesses.

  • Taiwan’s regulator proposes SMP rule changes

    Taiwan’s National Communications Commission (NCC) has proposed regulations that would enhance its power to determine what entities would become “significant market powers” (SMPs), while allowing carriers to use frequencies more flexibly, the Taipei Times reports.

  • China aims to boost telecoms investment

    The Chinese government has renewed calls for private investment in the country's telecoms firms as it encourages them to cut fees and other costs and become more competitive in offering internet-related services, reports Reuters.

  • India consults again on net neutrality

    The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) has published another consultation paper on net neutrality, inviting stakeholders to provide their views on issues relating to the establishment of a comprehensive framework for non-discriminatory access to the internet, notes TeleGeography.

  • Australia proposes changes to its universal service obligation

    Australia’s Productivity Commission has recommended what it has termed “a modernised and forward-looking approach to the subsidy and support arrangements that form universal telecommunications services in Australia”, notes TeleGeography.

  • Two mobile operators vie to be become Singapore’s number four

    Singapore fibre start-up MyRepublic and Australian telco TPG Telecom have been given the nod to proceed to the auction phase of the upcoming race to become Singapore’s fourth mobile network operator (MNO), reports TeleGeography.

  • Singapore kicks off Li-Fi light-based trials

    Singapore’s regulator, IMDA, is waiving frequency fees associated with Li-Fi (light fidelity) trials to encourage technical trials of this technology. Li-Fi is a light-based communication technology “that has the potential to provide a new layer of wireless connectivity...

  • China clamps down on internet freedom

    China has passed a sweeping law tightening restrictions on internet freedoms, a move that foreign businesses say threatens to shut them out of one of the world’s biggest technology markets, reports the Financial Times.

  • Internet speed complaints rise in Australia

    As Australia’s National Broadband Network (NBN) ramps up its rollout, the issues and frustrations faced by those connecting to the new network have also increased, notes News.com.au.

  • Singapore’s converged regulator is now a reality

    Singapore's new converged telecoms and media regulator, the Infocomm and Media Development Authority (IMDA), has now been launched, reports Telecom Asia. “The new agency has been tasked with helping Singapore seize opportunities in the converging telecoms and media sectors ...”

  • Australian competition authority keeps ADSL regulation; releases issue paper

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has issued a draft decision that it will continue to regulate the wholesale asymmetrical digital subscriber line (ADSL) service for a further five years. It considers that continuing to regulate the wholesale ADSL service will benefit customers by promoting competition in broadband markets until the National Broadband Network (NBN) rollout is complete.

  • Australian competition authority keeps ADSL regulation; releases issue paper (Copy)

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has issued a draft decision that it will continue to regulate the wholesale asymmetrical digital subscriber line (ADSL) service for a further five years. It considers that continuing to regulate the wholesale ADSL service will benefit customers by promoting competition in broadband markets until the National Broadband Network (NBN) rollout is complete.

  • Digital Thailand in Motion

    Thailand’s digital economy and society agenda is at full swing after the cabinet approved the digital plan in April. The plan sets out a roadmap to transform the nation into a technology and innovation driven society. The new Digital Economy and Society Ministry will be officially established in September, replacing the Information and Communication (ICT) Ministry. Click here to read more.  

  • ACMA Research - Digital lives of older Australians

    The ACMA has released research that aims to explore the levels of online engagement of older Australians (those aged 65 and over). 

  • Cryptocurrencies: not disruptive but opening up new uses

    TA report from Citi Research does not view cryptocurrencies as a disruptive threat to banks or card networks, noting that centralised domestic payment systems provide a relatively good experience.

  • FCC receives zero-rating complaints; BEREC is lobbied

    The FCC has received more than 100,000 complaints from Americans calling on the regulator to take strong enforcement action if and when companies violate the FCC's Open Internet Order with zero-rating schemes. 

  • Data-driven regulation in France

    Arcep, France's telecoms regulator, has described how it will use 'data-driven' regulation to steer the market in the right direction.

  • OECD ministerial meeting is launchpad for ‘One Internet’ report

    One Internet, the final report and recommendations of the Global Commission on Internet Governance, was released at the OECD ministerial meeting on the digital economy in Cancún, Mexico, in June.

  • Top nations pull ahead in ICT clout

    The Global Information Technology Report 2016 from the World Economic Forum (WEF) has found that Finland, Switzerland, Sweden, Israel, Singapore, the Netherlands and the US are leading the world when it comes to generating economic impact from investments in ICT.

  • Competition barriers in South Africa

    "The structure of South Africa's economy welcomes few entrants. It is highly concentrated with insiders firmly entrenched. Widening access to the economy, according to the results of a set of studies released this week, will require a concerted and collaborative effort by the government to alter the economic landscape, remove barriers to entry, enhance competition and foster inclusive growth."

  • New Zealand published utility-style options paper

    New Zealand has issued an options paper on its ongoing review of its telecoms act. It provides more detail on the proposed 'utility-style' regulatory framework for fixed line communication services and communications minister, Amy Adams.

  • Europe adopts privacy shield

    The European Commission has adopted the EU-US privacy shield, a framework that "protects the fundamental rights of anyone in the EU whose personal data is transferred to the US as well as bringing legal clarity for businesses relying on transatlantic data transfers".

  • Dutch regulator warns on net neutrality; will relax fixed line market

    The Netherlands Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM) is warning telecoms companies that the new European rules on net neutrality must be applied correctly.

  • FCC first to open up high frequencies

    The FCC has adopted new rules for wireless broadband operations in frequencies above 24 GHz, making the US the first country to make this spectrum available for next generation wireless services. The rules open up nearly 11 GHz of high-frequency spectrum for flexible, mobile and fixed use wireless broadband

  • Data retention in Europe may be legal

    One of Europe's top legal advisers thinks the data retention laws in Sweden and the UK may be 'legit' but with strict conditions, reports Fortune.

  • Spectrum order in the Philippines

    The chief of the new Philippines Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT) has ordered the inventory of used and unused telecoms spectrum, reports Telecom Asia.

  • 5G manifesto calls for relaxation in net neutrality

    In a 5G manifesto, a group of European telecoms service providers and equipment manufacturers have called for a relaxation of net neutrality rules, reports TeleGeography.

  • Italian regulator looks at OTT services; broadband plan approved

    Italian telecoms regulator Agcom has published the results of a study into electronic communications services, and in particular over the top (OTT) social messaging tools such as WhatsApp, Skype, iMessage and Facebook Messenger, notes TeleGeography.

  • Australian competition authority keeps ADSL regulation; releases issue paper

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has issued a draft decision that it will continue to regulate the wholesale asymmetrical digital subscriber line (ADSL) service for a further five years.

  • Commission’s leak reveals faster broadband target

    The European Commission wants internet download speeds to reach 100 Mbits/s by 2025 and is calling for more public funds to build faster networks, according to a leaked document obtained by EurActiv.com.

  • UK gets tough on data breaches

    The UK government's Culture, Media and Sport Committee has recommended a prison sentence of up to two years for those convicted of unlawfully obtaining and selling personal data.

Stay up to date with the IIC

We will give you a monthly round up of up-coming events, where we’ve been as well as interviews and selected articles from InterMedia.

Subscribe to PolicyWorld