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Commission’s leak reveals faster broadband target

The European Commission wants internet download speeds to reach 100 Mbits/s by 2025 and is calling for more public funds to build faster networks, according to a leaked document obtained by EurActiv.com. The Commission is expected to publish the document on 21 September along with legislative proposals to overhaul current EU telecoms law. "One Commission official rejected criticism that the executive's target is too low, calling 100 Mbits/s 'realistic'. 'We assume that every village will have gigabit connectivity by 2025,' the official said." The executive is also planning to introduce rules that will safeguard competition between larger telecoms operators and newer companies. The document says the proposal expected for September will include 'a number of targeted changes' to speed up internet connections and boost competition. "They provide the necessary safeguards for competition (by maintaining regulated access to bottlenecks) and at the same time enhance the rollout of very high-capacity networks, driven where possible by infrastructure competition," the document reads. National telecoms regulators will also be beefed up under the proposal, which will boost the watchdogs' authority to sanction large "dominant operators that unjustifiably deviate from their declared intentions" to invest in networks. http://bit.ly/29T3Vbz The FT reports that the commission will also look at reviewing state aid rules, in a bid to encourage more public investment and create a so-called 'gigabit society'. "Industry figures were sceptical about how much public funding would be forthcoming, however." Read More

  • Wednesday, 20 July 2016

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