International Institute of Communications

Shaping the policy agenda: TELECOMMUNICATIONS • MEDIA • TECHNOLOGY
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Competition Policy

Where are the modern monopolies? Does the communications regulator have a role in regulating them? Our members address the challenges facing policy makers and regulators discussing questions such as 'should categories of broadcasting content on free to air television such as news and current affairs or local language content be sheltered, by whom and with what'? Competition investigations into alleged abuse of dominance are rife all over the world. Vertical as well as horizontal competition challenges abound, including those created by increasing consolidation. We regularly include speakers from specialist legal advisors in this field who have a wealth of sector and geographical experience to share with participants.


Call for OTT TV regulation in Africa Call for OTT TV regulation in Africa

Spooked by Netflix’s growing popularity among African viewers, the continent’s largest television operator wants the disruptor to be regulated, reports Quartz Africa. “This call for regulation is a common call from established monopolies who find their grip on a local market challenged by a tech disruptor, and MultiChoice is no different.

  • Monday, 23 July 2018

Key speakers on Competition Policy

Ajit Pai

Ajit Pai

Adriana Labardini Inzunza

Adriana Labardini Inzunza

Alan Knott-Craig Jr.

Alan Knott-Craig Jr.

Alison Gillwald (PhD)

Alison Gillwald (PhD)

André Merigoux

André Merigoux

Antonio López-Istúriz White

Antonio López-Istúriz White

Talks on Competition Policy

  • ACCC Chairman speaks at IIC telecoms forum

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has published the final report of its communications sector market study, which includes 28 recommendations and actions on competition and consumer issues.

  • Are Australian consumers paying for Google’s data collection?

    Google is under investigation by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) and the country’s Privacy Commissioner following claims that it collects data from millions of Android smartphone users, who unwittingly pay their telecoms service providers for gigabytes consumed by the activity, reports Reuters.

  • Australia announces ASEAN initiative to promote digital trade

    The Australian Government has announced a joint initiative with the ten countries of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) to promote digital trade and support inclusive economic growth in our region.

  • Australia kicks off inquiry into wholesale data services

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has started a public inquiry to determine whether declaration of the domestic transmission capacity service (DTCS) remains appropriate in light of changes to the market, including the growth of commercial alternatives available to service providers, new National Broadband Network (NBN) products for business customers, and industry consolidation.

  • Australia seeks to modernise copyright laws

    The Australian Government has announced a review of the Australian Copyright Act 1968 following on from the Productivity Commission’s review and report on Australia’s Intellectual Property Arrangements.

  • Australia’s ACCC issues final market report

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has published the final report of its communications sector market study, which includes 28 recommendations and actions on competition and consumer issues.

  • BEREC finds 4-to-3 mobile mergers may push prices up

    Mergers reducing the number of mobile operators from four to three may push prices for end-users higher in the short to medium term, even with remedies such as MVNO access, according to a study published by EU regulator BEREC.

  • Broadband targets

    Balancing investment predictability, competition and consumer choice to get every European digital. This talk took place on Tuesday 17th March 2015 as part of the IIC Telecommunications & Media Forum in Brussels.

  • Call for OTT TV regulation in Africa

    Spooked by Netflix’s growing popularity among African viewers, the continent’s largest television operator wants the disruptor to be regulated, reports Quartz Africa. “This call for regulation is a common call from established monopolies who find their grip on a local market challenged by a tech disruptor, and MultiChoice is no different.

  • Chaos of Mother’s Day sale investigated by Taiwan’s regulator

    Japan Communications says it has received Japan’s first regulatory certification under both the Radio Law and Telecommunications Business Law for an unlicensed LTE (u-LTE) base station – and JCI chairman Frank Seiji Sanda says, “u-LTE is the first step in the obsolescence of legacy mobile operators.”

  • Finland’s regulator imposes price caps to boost broadband competition

    High wholesale prices impede competition in the broadband market, so the Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority (FICORA) is imposing price caps on fibre local loops provided by the three market leaders in Finland, and regulation on copper local loops will be scaled down. Read

More InterMedia articles on Competition Policy

  • Taming the oligopolists

    Sumit Sharma extends the argument for using competition policy rather than regulation for convergent networks by looking at oligopoly models.
    June 2015, Volume 43 Issue 02

  • Friendly foes

    How can network operators and service providers settle value for their wares in a converged world, where services are network agnostic? sumit sharma presents a bargaining framework that could unite all players in a ‘game’
    April 2016, Volume 44 Issue 01

  • Platforms of Power

    The rise of content and media intermediaries such as Google and Facebook as digital gatekeepers raises major policy and regulation concerns, writes Robin Mansell.
    March 2015, Volume 43 Issue 01

  • Moral Fibre

    Should policymakers 'do what is right' and promote all-fibre broadband networks? Catherine Middleton weighs up the arguments

    April 2016, Volume 44 Issue 01

  • Principles for Policymakers

    Today’s media and communications world needs a fundamental set of principles to help policymakers determine public value. ROBERT PICARD and VICTOR PICKARD have just such a global set to hand.

    July 2017, Volume 45 Issue 2

  • Voyage of discovery

    Jean-Pierre Blais reports from Canada on 'discoverability' and the paradox of finding good television content in an age of seeming abundance
    April 2016, Volume 44 Issue 01

  • Fibre: Taking the Right Steps

    To get the broadband infrastructure and consumer benefit that are needed, regulators have to abandon the short-term thinking that can stifle new entrants and investment, argue RICHARD CADMAN, JONATHAN KINGAN and GITA SORENSEN 

    April 2018, Volume 46 Issue 1

  • Searching For The Creative Economy

    Ian Hargreaves  pieces together projects and evidence that are defining a crucial, technology driven sector of the economy.
    January 2016, Volume 43 Issue 04

  • Shedding Light on 5G Policy

    In part two of his discussion of the ‘myth of 5G’, WILLIAM WEBB examines regulatory factors, spectrum issues and whether fixed-wireless access will be more than a promise - plus scenarios for the next few years

    July 2017, Volume 45 Issue 2

  • The meaning of net neutrality

    The dust has finally begun to settle on the new US and European net neutrality laws. Richard Feasey compares and contrasts
    April 2016, Volume 44 Issue 01

  • A Global Challenge

    Setting out a framework for coherent policy and regulation for the digital economy is our major challenge, especially for countries outside of the EU and US, writes RAINER SCHNEPFLEITNER.

    April 2017, Volume 45 Issue 1

  • A Tipping Point For Regulation

    With the rise of OTT there's no doubt we are in the midst of transition in telecoms markets - but how best to respond, asks Brian Williamson.
    September 2015, Volume 43 Issue 03

  • Competition and Big Data

    The legal highlights of a joint report by the French and German competition authorities on the use of data are discussed by Tim Cowen.
    July 2016, Volume 44 Issue 02

  • Digital Doha

    The IIC’s first TMF of 2017 was held in Doha, with OTT and IoT issues to the fore, as CRISTINA MURRONI reports.

    July 2017, Volume 45 Issue 2

  • Europe in the Round (Part 2)

    Peter Alexiadis concludes his tour of the trade-offs inherent in communications regulation.
    July 2016, Volume 44 Issue 02

  • Openings for Zero Rating

    Zero rating is a highly controversial aspect of the internet. AUGUSTO PRETA and PENG PENG provide a cost-benefit analysis amid the context of net neutrality.
    July 2016, Volume 44 Issue 02

  • Q&A With Adriana Labardini

    Commissioner, Mexico’s IFT
    January 2016, Volume 43 Issue 04

  • Rules of the Game

    How much does politics shape competition and regulation in the mobile industry? Quite a lot, as MARC BEISHON finds in a paper that takes a deep dive into the issue.

    July 2017, Volume 45 Issue 2

  • Solving the Online Platform Puzzle

    How can policymakers make sense of the impact of online platforms? CHRISTIAN HILDEBRANDT and RENÉ ARNOLD put forward a model that covers the complex dimensions.

    April 2017, Volume 45 Issue 1

  • Spectrum Clash

    The pressure on terrestrial broadcasters to give spectrum to the mobile sector shows no sign of letting up. Roland Beutler, at Germany's Südwestrundfunk, a regional public broadcaster, puts his side of the debate.
    September 2015, Volume 43 Issue 03

  • The Agenda for Europe

    GEORG SERENTSCHY sets out the agenda for Europe in 2017, which looks likely to be critical in developing aspirations for the digital single market.

    January 2017, Volume 44 Issue 4

  • The End of Politics?

    Are digital technologies making politics impossible? It’s a question addressed by political scientist STEVEN MICHELS - who is not optimistic.

    July 2017, Volume 45 Issue 2

  • Zero-Rating Behaviour

    Does zero-rating harm competition? It’s a key question in the net neutrality debate. TIM HOGG takes a behavioural economics approach to finding the answer 

    April 2018, Volume 46 Issue 1

Regulatory Watch articles on Competition Policy

  • Call for OTT TV regulation in Africa

    Spooked by Netflix’s growing popularity among African viewers, the continent’s largest television operator wants the disruptor to be regulated, reports Quartz Africa. “This call for regulation is a common call from established monopolies who find their grip on a local market challenged by a tech disruptor, and MultiChoice is no different.

  • UK ISPs back new rules for internet platforms

    Three major internet service providers in the UK have said they would back a regulator to oversee rules for web giants – but warned lawmakers not to forget smaller firms or the bigger picture, reports the Register.

  • Romania consults on public access tariffs for operators

    Romania's telecoms authority, Ancom, has opened a consultation on a draft decision for setting the maximum tariffs to be charged on operators exercising the right of access to state-owned public property, notes Telecompaper.

  • India combats fraudulent and intrusive calls

    India’s regulator, TRAI, has released the Telecom Commercial Communication Customer Preference regulation, which is aimed at cutting down the number of fraudulent and intrusive calls across the country, reports Firstpost.

  • Germany’s Monopolies Commission makes proposals on algorithms and media

    Germany’s Monopolies Commission in its latest biennial report says that digital change requires legal adjustments regarding price algorithms and the media sector.

  • Germany’s regulator wants platforms on a level playing field

    Germany’s top telecoms regulator has set its sights on US technology groups such as Google and Facebook, insisting that providers of messaging and email services should be regulated just like ordinary telecoms companies, reports the Financial Times.

  • India goes for strong net neutrality rules

    Eight months after India’s telecoms regulator came out swinging heavily in favour of the principle of net neutrality, the Department of Telecommunications (DoT) has finally agreed to adopt the same, reports the Wire.

  • Competition law ‘not fit for purpose’

    A British thinktank has issued proposals for a radical overhaul of regulation of the technology sector, which it argues is “unfit for purpose, incentivises bad behaviour and has failed to address ethical questions about big data and its use”.

  • ACCC Chairman speaks at IIC telecoms forum

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has published the final report of its communications sector market study, which includes 28 recommendations and actions on competition and consumer issues.

  • US Federal Trade Commission in the net neutrality spotlight

    AT&T has given up its years-long quest to hinder the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) authority to regulate broadband providers, reports Ars Technica.

  • GSMA calls European code a ‘political compromise’

    Latest comment on agreement on the European Electronic Communications Code come from mobile industry body, the GSMA, which considers it “is a political compromise that fails to confront long term challenges for the European telecoms sector and could hinder deployment of 5G networks in Europe, weakening the region’s competitiveness and harming European citizens.”

  • BEREC finds 4-to-3 mobile mergers may push prices up

    Mergers reducing the number of mobile operators from four to three may push prices for end-users higher in the short to medium term, even with remedies such as MVNO access, according to a study published by EU regulator BEREC.

  • Zimbabwe cuts mobile charges ahead of election

    The Postal and Telecommunications Regulatory Authority of Zimbabwe (Potraz) has reduced local mobile data and internet charges after concluding a cost modelling exercise for telecommunication network services in the country covering mobile, fixed and internet access networks, reports AllAfrica.

  • India and Europe regulators sign up to net neutrality

    RS Sharma, chair of the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) and Johannes Gungl, chair of European regulators body, BEREC, have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) under which they advocate for effective electronic communications regulation.

  • Critics say Europe’s e-privacy regulation will cut revenues

    On the heels of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Europe is gearing up for its next big privacy push, this time taking aim at data collection within messaging apps. But critics contend the proposed law goes too far, potentially stifling innovation and hurting profits, according to an article in OWI Insight.

  • Ofcom publishes on wholesale broadband, and universal service

    UK regulator, Ofcom, has issued two documents of wider interest. The first is an assessment of competition in wholesale broadband access markets, under which services in these markets are bought by telecoms providers to supply retail broadband services to residential and business consumers.

  • European parliament vote on copyright alarms internet activists

    A European parliament committee has voted for legislation that internet pioneers fear will turn the web into “a tool for surveillance and control”, reports the Guardian.

  • Chaos of Mother’s Day sale investigated by Taiwan’s regulator

    Japan Communications says it has received Japan’s first regulatory certification under both the Radio Law and Telecommunications Business Law for an unlicensed LTE (u-LTE) base station – and JCI chairman Frank Seiji Sanda says, “u-LTE is the first step in the obsolescence of legacy mobile operators.”

  • Are Australian consumers paying for Google’s data collection?

    Google is under investigation by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) and the country’s Privacy Commissioner following claims that it collects data from millions of Android smartphone users, who unwittingly pay their telecoms service providers for gigabytes consumed by the activity, reports Reuters.

  • South Africa’s regulator responds to call for data price cuts

    South Africa’s regulator, ICASA, has published end user and subscriber service charter regulations as the start of a three-pronged process to address concerns about the cost of data services.

  • GSMA finds mobile development lagging in Central America

    Deployment of 4G is lagging in Central America and the region needs to up its game or risk putting its future economic development at risk, the GSMA has stated in a report.

  • Kosovo’s regulator approves consumer and net neutrality regulations

    Kosovo’s telecoms watchdog, the Regulatory Authority for Post and Electronic Communications (ARKEP), has approved new regulations that look to shore up consumers’ rights and update existing rules to ensure net neutrality, notes TeleGeography.

  • ECTA joins in with warnings about European Electronic Communications Code

    The European Competitive Telecommunications Association (ECTA) has sent an open letter to the EU to share its concern that the EU’s vision for a connected digital single market “risks being stopped dead in its tracks before it can effectively take off”.

  • New telecoms law in Democratic Republic of Congo

    The Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC’s) National Assembly has adopted a new Telecommunications Act to update the nation’s aging legal framework for the sector, bring the rules in line with the country’s needs and to align with other relevant legislation, notes TeleGeography.

  • FCC aims to reform educational band spectrum

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has adopted a notice of proposed rulemaking to update the framework for licensing educational broadband service (EBS) spectrum in the 2.5 GHz band.

  • US Senate sends warning shot over net neutrality repeal

    The US Senate has voted 52-47 to disapprove the FCC’s recent order replacing 2015’s net neutrality rules, “a pleasant surprise for internet advocates and consumers throughout the country”, reports TechCrunch.

  • Australia’s ACCC issues final market report

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has published the final report of its communications sector market study, which includes 28 recommendations and actions on competition and consumer issues.

  • Cross-border data flows examined in Asian study

    A paper published by Brookings looks at the importance of cross-border data flows, taking Asia as a model, and why they need regulating to stimulate the digital economy.

  • States gang up on FCC on net neutrality

    California is among the US states that could reintroduce net neutrality following the FCC’s overturning of the Open Internet Order.

  • Commission goes after Apple’s proposed music buy-up

    The European Commission has launched an investigation to assess Apple’s proposed acquisition of music app Shazam, expressing concerns the deal could reduce choice for users of music streaming services, reports Mobile World Live.

  • UK’s lays out universal service law

    The design of the UK's new universal service obligation (USO) for broadband has been specified in law, reports Out-Law.com. The UK government said the new USO would “ensure high speed broadband access for the whole of the UK by 2020”.

  • Taiwan’s regulator warns on impact of price war

    The telecoms regulator in Taiwan has warned that sparking a price war could impair how much operators are willing to invest in new services and networks, including 5G, reports Telecoms Tech.

  • South Africa consults on ICT ownership

    South Africa’s regulator, ICASA is to hold public hearings to discuss “the review and development of the authority position on historically disadvantaged persons and broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE)”, notes ITWeb.

  • EU antitrust chief turns to academics to help tackle tech challenges

    Europe’s antitrust chief, Margrethe Vestager, is looking to three academics to help her deal with anti-competitive practices in fast-moving technology markets, reports Reuters.

  • Australia announces ASEAN initiative to promote digital trade

    The Australian Government has announced a joint initiative with the ten countries of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) to promote digital trade and support inclusive economic growth in our region.

  • New NBN migration complaints-handling rules

    ACMA has released draft  complaints-handling rules designed to improve the experience of consumers moving to the National Broadband Network.

  • Gambling ad crackdown during primetime sport

    Gambling advertisements will be banned during the broadcast of live sports between 5am and 8:30pm on commercial free-to-air TV, radio and pay TV, ACMA has announced.

  • Australia seeks to modernise copyright laws

    The Australian Government has announced a review of the Australian Copyright Act 1968 following on from the Productivity Commission’s review and report on Australia’s Intellectual Property Arrangements.

  • Finland’s regulator imposes price caps to boost broadband competition

    High wholesale prices impede competition in the broadband market, so the Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority (FICORA) is imposing price caps on fibre local loops provided by the three market leaders in Finland, and regulation on copper local loops will be scaled down.

  • Australia kicks off inquiry into wholesale data services

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has started a public inquiry to determine whether declaration of the domestic transmission capacity service (DTCS) remains appropriate in light of changes to the market, including the growth of commercial alternatives available to service providers, new National Broadband Network (NBN) products for business customers, and industry consolidation.

  • European regulators body sets out priorities, including 5G and net neutrality

    The Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) has highlighted its focus areas for 2018 – with emphasis on a study on 5G, the latest data on international roaming, and a consultation paper on net neutrality.

  • Portuguese regulator gets tough on net neutrality

    Anacom, the Portuguese telecoms regulator, has accused the country’s main operators of violating European Union rules on net neutrality, reports Reuters.

  • Dutch competition authority takes note of telecoms regulation

    Approval by the ACM (Dutch competition authority) of KPN’s acquisition of fibre operator Reggefiber was upheld by the Dutch Trade and Industry Appeals Tribunal in February 2018 – and as a commentary in JD Supra says, in assessing the merger’s competitive effects, “the tribunal notably considered regulatory measures adopted pursuant to sector-specific telecoms regulation”.

  • India fines Google for ‘search bias’

    India’s antitrust watchdog imposed a 1.36 billion rupees ($21.17 million) fine on Google for “search bias” and abuse of its dominant position, in the latest regulatory setback for the world’s most popular internet search engine, reports Reuters.

  • European Commission issues revised SMP guideline draft

    The European Commission has published the drafts of revised SMP (significant market power) guidelines and an accompanying explanatory note. Both documents were sent to the Body of Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) for its opinion, with a view to adopting the guidelines in the second quarter of this year.

  • GSMA criticises Latin American spectrum policies

    The GSMA has issued a report, “Effective spectrum pricing in Latin America: policies to support better quality and more affordable mobile services”, highlighting that spectrum policies in Latin America are impacting the delivery of quality mobile services to consumers across the region.

  • Netherlands pronounces on the digital economy

    The Dutch government says it will come out this year with a strategy to help entrepreneurs and people in the Netherlands to benefit from the digital economy, notes Telecompaper. Secretary of State Mona Keijzer stated in an opinion that digitisation is not only about economics, but also touches on relationships in society, on safety and on accessibility.

  • Poland’s regulator issues final wholesale broadcasting proposals

    UKE, the Polish regulator, has closed a consolidation procedure on its draft proposals for the regulation of broadcasting services and television wholesale markets in Poland, notes Global Telecoms Business.

  • Benin transfers all subscribers of a mobile network

    Benin’s Authority for Regulation of Electronic Communications and Post (ARCEP) signed a decision on 17 January 2018 reassigning all subscribers of Globacom Benin (Glo Mobile) to the network of Moov Benin, reports TeleGeography.

  • Community fibre betters commercial ISPs in the US

    Researchers at the Berkman Klein Center in the US have found advantages for consumers in community fibre broadband compared with commercial offerings.

  • Ofcom’s review of regulatory trends

    UK regulator, Ofcom, has issued its “International communications market report 2017”, which includes a section on regulatory context.

  • ‘No change’ in VoIP policy in UAE

    The UAE's telecoms regulator has clarified that there is no change in its policy towards voice over internet protocol (VoIP) applications, following complaints by users that phone and video service Skype had been disrupted, reports The National.

  • Challenges mount to US net neutrality repeal

    A group of 21 US state attorney generals have filed suit to challenge the FCC’s decision to do away with net neutrality while Democrats said they needed just one more vote in the Senate to repeal the FCC ruling, reports Reuters.

  • Data protection will ‘boost growth’ in Africa

    Experts in information and communication technology say enforcing data protection laws will boost growth in Africa’s digital economy, reports The Cable.

  • FCC goes ahead with net neutrality repeal

    As expected, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted on party lines “to restore the longstanding, bipartisan light-touch regulatory framework that has fostered rapid internet growth, openness, and freedom for nearly 20 years”.

  • Q&A with Rob Strayer

    Rob Strayer, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Cyber and International Communications and Information Policy, US State Department

  • European reaffirms support for net neutrality

    The European Commission (EC) has reaffirmed its commitment to preserving net neutrality across Europe in the wake of a US vote to repeal its regulations, notes Mobile World Live.

  • India’s TRAI supports net neutrality in latest recommendations

    The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) has come out in strong support of net neutrality in a series of recommendations following a long process of consultation on the issue, reports The Hindu.

  • France’s regulator sets out framework for fibre rollout

    Arcep has set the regulatory framework that will govern how the incumbent, Orange, will roll out fibre services and access, notes Global Telecoms Business.

  • Australia opens inquiry into digital platforms

    Australia’s government has directed the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to start an inquiry into digital platform providers such as Facebook and Google.

  • Kenya to force mobile money competition

    he Communications Authority of Kenya will force mobile phone operators to share money transfer infrastructure, reports The Standard.

  • Bulgaria to prioritise European Communications Code in Council presidency; full EU spectrum reform in doubt

    Bulgaria will focus its attention on speeding up negotiations on the European Communications Code when it takes over the 6 month rotating presidency of the Council of Ministers in January, notes EurActiv.

  • UNICEF and European Commission release reports on children

    Despite children’s massive online presence – 1 in 3 internet users worldwide is a child – too little is done to protect them from the perils of the digital world and to increase their access to safe online content, UNICEF said in its annual flagship report.

  • Germany weighs up regulatory reform to speed fibre deployment

    Germany’s telecoms industry should accelerate the build-out of the country’s high-speed broadband network, its regulator said, adding it was considering easier regulation on fibre internet to speed the process, noted Reuters.

  • European Parliament rejects ending audiovisual territory licensing

    The European Parliament has rejected proposed legislation intended to prevent territory-by-territory licensing of programming across the European Union (EU), reports Informitv.

  • FCC goes ahead with media ownership changes

    As expected, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has loosened media ownership regulations in the US after a 3-2 vote by its executive which, while an expected development under the Trump administration, has drawn a mixed reaction, notes Rapid TV News.

  • Australia highlights broadband consumer concerns

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has published a draft report detailing its market study of the communications sector, which includes 29 recommendations spanning a wide range of competition and consumer issues in communications markets.

  • US stock markets converge on telecoms

    US equities indices are poised for a revamp to keep up with the evolving nature of communications, reports the Financial Times.

  • FCC chairman wants FM radio enabled in mobile phones

    FCC chairman, Ajit Pai, wants Apple to turn on the FM radio that’s hidden inside iPhones, reports The Verge. In a statement, he asked that Apple “reconsider its position, given the devastation wrought by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria.”

  • Germany’s regulator rules on zero-rating case

    The German telecoms regulator, Bundesnetzagentur, has issued a decision on Deutsche Telekom's zero-rated StreamOn offers, ruling that the scheme is legal, but the company must make some modifications, notes ZDNet.

  • European operators warn of risks to infrastructure under reform plans

    ETNO, the European Telecommunications Network Operators' Association, has issued a strong warning about the direction of the European Electronic Communications Code. It says it is “no ordinary legislation. This is a once-in-a-decade opportunity to unlock investment in world-class infrastructure, which is the core of a successful society and economy.

  • Estonian presidency pushes ahead with European reform

    The European Council has granted the Estonian presidency a mandate to begin negotiations with the European Parliament on the new European Electronic Communications Code. “Our future is digital, and these rules are key to creating a gigabit society throughout the EU,” said Urve Palo, Estonia's Minister for Entrepreneurship and Information Technology.

  • Australia decides not to mandate mobile roaming

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has decided not to “declare” (mandate) domestic mobile roaming. However, it says it has identified a range of regulatory and policy measures that could improve inadequate mobile phone coverage and poor quality of service in regional Australia.

  • Costa Rica’s regulator defends its decision on competition

    Costa Rican telecoms regulator, Sutel, has ratified its decision to declare the nation’s wireless market competitive, rejecting an appeal from the Ombudsman’s Office of Costa Rica (DHR), reports TeleGeography.

  • European body issues statement on regulatory competence

    BEREC, the body of European regulators, has issued a statement on the need for a minimum set of competences for independent national regulators (NRAs) for the new European Electronic Communications Code, as follows. First, independence is critical...

  • Economics of Australia’s national broadband network in doubt

    The CEO of Australia’s National Broadband Network (NBN) company, Bill Morrow, has confirmed what the industry has been saying for years: that the network builder’s economic model is broken and that – under current conditions – it may never turn a profit, report IT News.

  • Net neutrality complaints logged as FCC prepares to overturn the Open Internet Order

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has released more than 13,000 pages of net neutrality complaints filed by consumers against their internet service providers, reports Ars Technica.

  • Calls for digital taxation on internet giants

    France, Germany, Italy and Spain want digital multinationals like Amazon and Google to be taxed in Europe based on their revenues, rather than only on their profits, their finance ministers said in a joint letter, reports Reuters. 

  • GSMA finds fault in wholesale access networks

    The GSMA has brought out a report, “Wholesale open access networks”, which examines the performance of the wholesale open access network (WOAN) model (also known as single wholesale network, SWN) in five markets: Kenya, Mexico, Russia, Rwanda and South Africa.

  • Swiss government upgrades its telecoms act

    The Swiss Federal Council has adopted a partial revision of the Telecommunications Act (TCA), and the draft legislation will now be dealt with by parliament. The revision covers broadband services that are replacing traditional telecoms services and gives greater weight to consumer concerns, promotes competition and deregulation, and simplifies administration.

  • Digital giants, data and European authorities

    US tech giants are back in Europe’s spotlight, reports the Financial Times. Facebook and Google are both in the headlines over sanctions from European authorities, with Google kicking off its fight against a €2.4bn EU fine for abusing its market dominant position.

  • Costa Rican court intervenes on mobile regulation

    Costa Rica’s constitutional court has ordered sector watchdog the Superintendency of Telecommunications (Sutel) to impose a temporary minimum data transfer rate for post-paid mobile internet users that exceed their fair usage allowance, notes TeleGeography.

  • Denmark’s regulator issues broadband competition framework

    Denmark’s telecoms regulator, the Danish Business Authority (Erhvervsstyrelsen), has published two documents outlining the framework for competition in the broadband market, with the new decisions set to enter into force on 17 November 2017, notes TeleGeography.

  • South African draft mobile data regs could have unintended effects

    The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa's (ICASA’s) recent draft regulations on mobile data expiry and changes to out-of-bundle billing practices for telecoms operators could unintentionally raise data prices, reports ITWeb.

  • Voice calling apps in India may no longer be an issue

    A boost in data usage from the use of voice calling apps may mean the long-running debate into their regulation in India may turn out to be a “non-issue”, a source at the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) told The Economic Times.

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