International Institute of Communications

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Privacy, Safety, Security

IIC discussions explore ways to combine a respect for privacy and protection of personal data and critical information infrastructures, whilst enabling government authorities to protect national security interests. The NSA-Snowden revelations have had a major impact on discussions of privacy. Whereas before the focus was on the relative validity of different security approaches adopted by USA and Europe. In the post-PRISM debate the need to re-build trust towards providers and governments emerges strongly.


Key speakers on Privacy, Safety, Security

Thomas M Dailey

Thomas M Dailey

Aaron Burstein

Aaron Burstein

Adriana Labardini Inzunza

Adriana Labardini Inzunza

Alfredo Rafael Deluque Zuleta (Dr)

Alfredo Rafael Deluque Zuleta (Dr)

Andrew Barendse (Dr)

Andrew Barendse (Dr)

Angelo Marcello Cardani (Professor )

Angelo Marcello Cardani (Professor )

Talks on Privacy, Safety, Security

  • Privacy: Data protection, cyber security, cloud & critical infrastructure

    This talk took place on Thursday 28th May 2015 as part of the IIC Telecommunications & Media Forum in Miami. Read
    Privacy: Data protection, cyber security, cloud & critical infrastructure

More InterMedia articles on Privacy, Safety, Security

  • Q&A Ulf Pehrsson

    With ulf pehrsson, Ericsson's head of government and industry relations
    April 2016, Volume 44 Issue 01

  • 21st Century Privacy Fix

    With pressure mounting for new personal data privacy rules, Nancy Libin and Joshua Bercu assess the current state of play in the US and EU.
    June 2015, Volume 43 Issue 02

  • Privacy Research Directions

    Views and new studies about privacy from researchers at Aalborg University, Denmark
    June 2015, Volume 43 Issue 02

  • Final Countdown to Data Protection

    A long overdue reform in European data protection law has finally taken shape, as Maurizio Mensi explains.
    January 2016, Volume 43 Issue 04

  • Voyage of discovery

    Jean-Pierre Blais reports from Canada on 'discoverability' and the paradox of finding good television content in an age of seeming abundance
    April 2016, Volume 44 Issue 01

  • Anti-Spam Action

    Canada’s CRTC and the IIC kicked off discussion on international efforts to combat unwanted communications, as STEVEN HARROUN explains.

    April 2017, Volume 45 Issue 1

  • Europe's New Code for OTT

    There are few issues more fraught than how to deal with over the top services. ANDREAS GRÜNWALD and CHRISTOPH NÜSSING examine Europe’s draft code.

    January 2017, Volume 44 Issue 4

  • Protect and Roam

    Matt Hatton reviews the main regulatory trends in the world of M2M and the internet of things.
    March 2015, Volume 43 Issue 01

  • Smartphones: Liberation or Limits?

    As more people, especially the less well off, have only a smartphone to access the internet, there are signs that a new type of digital divide could develop.  Ofcom’s Alison Preston describes new research carried out in the UK.
    July 2016, Volume 44 Issue 02

  • Stress Testing the US Privacy Framework

    Two major planks of US privacy regulation, including controversial new broadband rules, are discussed by AARON BURSTEIN and JOSHUA BERCU.

    January 2017, Volume 44 Issue 4

  • Time to Lead

    The latest ransomware attacks should be a catalyst for a more strategic approach to cybersecurity, argues MALCOLM TAYLOR.

    July 2017, Volume 45 Issue 2

Regulatory Watch articles on Privacy, Safety, Security

  • European employees must be told of workplace email monitoring

    Companies must tell employees in advance if their work email accounts are being monitored without unduly infringing their privacy, the European Court of Human Rights said in a ruling on defining the scope of corporate email snooping, reports Reuters.

  • Digital giants, data and European authorities

    US tech giants are back in Europe’s spotlight, reports the Financial Times. Facebook and Google are both in the headlines over sanctions from European authorities, with Google kicking off its fight against a €2.4bn EU fine for abusing its market dominant position.

  • Consenting to adware on new computers

    The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in the US says it cannot stop computer makers from selling computers that inject ads into webpages to US consumers, notes Ars Technica.

  • Workplace health tracking devices could be ruled out in Europe

    Startups hoping to sell health tracking devices and software to corporate customers are worried European regulators will torpedo their business model, reports Bloomberg.

  • Wiretapping children’s watches banned in Germany

    Certain smartwatches for children can no longer be sold in Germany as some of these models are equipped with a “wiretapping” function, reports Deutsche Welle. Germany’s Federal Network Agency, or Bundesnetzagentur, announced the ban saying that these watches can be classed as ‘unauthorised transmitters’.

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We will give you a monthly round up of up-coming events, where we’ve been as well as interviews and selected articles from InterMedia.

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